Horse Racing Terms

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Horse Racing Terms

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Horse Racing Terms and Jargon Buster. The world of horse racing contains plenty of confusing. A-Z Glossary Of Horse Racing Terms If you’ve had a good look around this site then hopefully you’ve learnt some things that you didn’t know before as well as gained a solid all-round idea of how betting on horse racing works. HORSE- Broadly, in any Thoroughbred regardless of sex. Specifically, an entire male 5 years old or older. HORSING- Mare in heat. HOTWALKER- Person who walks horses to cool them out after workout or. Horse Racing Terms. 1) All the runners in a race. 2) Some sportsbooks or bookmakers may well group all the outsiders in a competition under the banner headline of 'Field' 1) Race for which the track handicapper assigns the weights to be carried. Each horse is allocated a different weight to. This is a glossary of horse racing terms you will hear used at the Saratoga Race Course. Make sure to learn the jarjon and technical terms of horse racing so you can impress your friends when you are at the Saratoga Race Track. Coates, R: Horse Racing Terms: An illustrated guide | Coates, Rosemary | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. Finden Sie Top-Angebote für Horse Racing Terms: An Illustrated Guide by Rosemary Coates bei eBay. Kostenlose Lieferung für viele Artikel! Finden Sie Top-Angebote für Horse Racing Terms DC Coates Rosemary bei eBay. Kostenlose Lieferung für viele Artikel! Ergebnis: 0 / 5. Which horse racing term am I? a collective bet, esp on four or more races, in which the stake and winnings on each successive race are carried​.

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Bearing In Out - Failing to maintain a straight course, veering to the left or right. Can be caused by injury, fatigue, outside distraction, or poor riding.

Beeswax - UK slang term for betting tax. Also known as 'Bees' or 'Ajax'. Bell Lap - In harness racing, the last lap of a race, signified by the ringing of the bell.

Bet - A transaction in which monies are deposited or guaranteed. Betting Board - A board used by the bookmaker to display the odds of the horses engaged in a race.

Betting Ring - The main area at a racecourse where the bookmakers operate. Betting Tax - Tax on a Bookmaker's turnover. In the UK this is a 'Duty' levied on every Pound wagered.

In the latter case, no tax is deducted from the punter's winnings. Bettor US - Someone who places or has a bet. A 'Punter' in the UK. Beyer Number - A handicapping tool, popularized by author Andrew Beyer, assigning a numerical value to each race run by a horse based on final time and track condition.

This enables different horses running at different racetracks to be objectively compared. Bismarck - A favourite which the bookmakers do not expect to win.

Blanket Finish - When the horses finish so close to the winning line you could theoretically put a single blanket across them.

Blinkers - A cup-shaped device applied over the sides of the horse's head near his eyes to limit his vision. This helps to prevent him from swerving away from distracting objects or other horses on either side of him.

Blinker cups come in a variety of sizes and shapes to allow as little or as much vision as the trainer feels is appropriate. Board - Short for 'Tote Board' on which odds, betting pools and other race information are displayed.

Bomb er - A winning horse sent off at very high odds. Book - A bookmaker's tally of amounts bet on each competitor, and odds necessary to assure him of profit.

Bookie - U. Short for bookmaker. The person or shop who accepts bets. Bookmaker - Person who is licensed to accept bets on the result of an event based on their provision of odds to the customer.

Sportsbook US. Bottle - UK slang, odds of 2 to 1. Box - A wagering term denoting a combination bet whereby all possible numeric combinations are covered.

Boxed in - To be trapped between other horses. Bobble - A bad step away from the starting gate, sometimes caused by the ground breaking away from under a horse and causing him to duck his head or go to his knees.

Bolt - Sudden veering from a straight course. Book - A collection of all the bets taken on fixed odds betting events.

Bookmaker Bookie - A person registered and licensed to bet with the public. Breakage - Those pennies that are left over in pari-mutuel payoffs which are rounded out to a nickel or dime.

Breeders' Cup - Thoroughbred racing's year-end championship. First run in Bridge-Jumper US - Bettor who specializes in large show bets on odd-on favourites.

Bug Boy - An apprentice rider. Bull Ring - Small racetrack less than one mile around. Buy Price - In Spread or Index betting, the higher figure quoted by an Index bookmaker.

Buy the Rack US - Purchase every possible daily-double or other combination ticket. Canadian - Also known as a Super Yankee.

A Canadian is a combination bet consisting of 26 bets with 5 selections in different events. The combination bet is made up of 10 doubles, 10 trebles, five 4-folds and one 5-fold.

Card - Another term for fixture or race meeting. Carpet - UK slang for Odds of 3 to 1 also known as 'Tres' or 'Gimmel'. Caulk - Projection on the bottom of a shoe to give the horse better traction, especially on a wet track.

Chalk - Wagering favorite in a race. Dates from the days when on-track bookmakers would write current odds on a chalkboard. Chalk Player - Bettor who wagers on favorites.

Chase - See 'Steeplechase'. Checked - A horse pulled up by his jockey for an instant because he is cut off or in tight quarters.

Chute - Extension of the backstretch or homestretch to allow a longer straight run. Client US - Purchaser of betting information from horseman or other tipster.

Close US - Final odds on a horse e. Confusingly equates to 'Starting Price' in the UK. Closer - A horse that runs best in the latter part of the race closing race , coming from off the pace.

Co-Favorites - Where three or more competitors share the status as favorite. Colors Colours - Racing silks, the jacket and cap worn by jockeys.

Silks can be generic and provided by the track or specific to one owner. Colt - An ungelded entire male horse four-years-old or younger.

Conditional Jockey - Same as 'Apprentice' but also allowed to jump. Correct Weight - Horses are allocated a weight to carry that is checked before and, for at least the placegetters, after a race.

Correct weight must be signaled before bets can be paid out. Daily Double - Type of wager calling for the selection of winners of two consecutive races, usually the first and second.

See 'Late Double'. Daily Racing Form - A daily newspaper containing racing information including news, past performance data and handicapping.

Daily Triple - A wager where the bettor must select the winner of three consecutive races. Dead Heat - A tie. Two or more horses finishing equal in a race.

Dead Track - Racing surface lacking resiliency. Declaration Of Weights - The publication of weights allocated to each horse nominated for a race by the handicapper.

Declared - In the United States, a horse withdrawn from a stakes race in advance of scratch time. In Europe, a horse confirmed to start in a race.

Deductions - When a horse is scratched from a race after betting on that race has already started, deductions are taken out of the win and place bets at a rate in proportion to the odds of the scratched horse.

Derby - A stakes event for three-year-olds. Distanced - Well beaten, finishing a long distance behind the winner. Dog US - The underdog in any betting proposition.

Dog Player US - A bettor who mainly wagers on the underdog. Double - Selecting the winners in two specific races. Double Carpet - UK slang for Odds of 33 to 1, based on 'Carpet'.

Draw - Refers to a horse's placing in the starting stalls. For flat racing only. Stall numbers are drawn at random. Drift - Also, Ease Odds that 'Lengthen', are said to have drifted, or be 'On The Drift'.

Driving - Strong urging by rider. Dual Forecast - A tote bet operating in races of 3 or more declared runners in which the punter has to pick the first two to finish in either order.

Back to Top. An each way bet is when you have the same amount on the horse for a win and for a place. Bookmakers will give you one quarter of the win odds for a place in fields of eight or more and one third of the win odds in fields of six or seven horses.

Each Way Double - Two separate bets of a win double and a place double. Each Way Single - Two bets.

The first is for the selection to win; the second for it to be placed each way. Eclipse Award - Thoroughbred racing's year-end awards, honoring the top horses in 11 separate categories.

Enclosure - The area where the Runners gather for viewing before and after the race. Equibase Company - A partnership between The Jockey Club and the Thoroughbred Racing Associations to establish and maintain an industry-owned, central database of racing records.

Equibase past-performance information is used in track programs across North America. Evenly - Neither gaining nor losing position or distance during a race.

Even Money Bet or Evens - A bet. Exacta - Also, Perfecta A wager that picks the first two finishers in a race in the exact order of finish.

Straight Forecast in the UK. Exacta Box - A wager in which all possible combinations using a given number of horses are covered.

Exotic wager - Any wager other than win, place or show. Exposure - The amount of money one actually stands to lose on a game or race.

Extended - Forced to run at top speed. False Favorite - A horse that is a race favorite despite being outclassed by others.

Faltered - A horse that was in contention early in the race but drops back in the late stages. Fast track - Optimum condition for a dirt track that is dry, even, resilient and fast.

Favorite - The most popular horse in a race, which is quoted at the lowest odds because it is deemed to have the best chance of winning the race.

Feature Races - Top races. Fence - The inside fence is the inside running rail around the race track, while the outside fence is the outside running rail.

Field - 1 All the runners in a race. This is known as favorite vs the field betting and is common in horse and golf betting. Field Horse - Two or more starters running as a single betting unit, when there are more entrants than positions on the totalisator board can accommodate.

A horse whose chance of winning is considered unlikely by the market. A horse who races with the aim of ensuring the even tempo of race, thus helping a stablemate who would benefit.

The area of a racecourse where horses are paraded before each race. Often referred to as the parade ring. Parade ring.

Also referred to as the paddock. Photo finish. Pulled up. A horse who is brought to a halt during a race by its jockey. Someone who has had a bet on the outcome of a race.

Pushed out. A term to describe a horse who has gone clear of its rivals in a race after minimal urging from its jockey.

A term to describe a horse being trained and getting practice over obstacles. Father of a horse. A horse who competes in races run over a short distance, usually over six furlongs or less.

A male horse used for breeding. The box from which horses begin Flat races. Staying on. An inquiry held at the racecourse on a raceday after any given race.

The panel is advised by the stewards. An establishment set up for breeding of horses. Stallions are based at studs and are sent mares to breed with.

The main auctioneer of racehorses in Britain and Ireland. The breed of horse best known for its use in horseracing.

Triple Crown. Turn of foot. A term to describe marked exceleration during a race. Before a race, the starter brings the field of horses into order to prepare them for the start of the race.

Bearing in or Out: Quite often when a horse tires it starts to change direction from a straight line and bear in or out on the track.

This can also happen when a jockey is losing control of the horse. Bell: A bell is used at some race tracks when the gates open to start a race.

Bit: One of the main ways a jockey controls the horse is by using a bit. Blanket Finish: In some races, the finish is so tight that you could literally put a blanket over the top of both horses, hence the term a blanket finish is born.

Blaze: You may notice on some horses that are completely brown or tan they have a blaze of white on their face. This is known, funnily enough, as a blaze.

It can be quite a distinguishing feature on a horse and is a wonderful way to tell the difference between two otherwise very similar looking animals.

The better jockeys out there will have cunning strategies and ride their horses in a way to avoid ending up in a blind switch.

Blinkers: Some horses get distracted by the other horses around them in races and the crowds of people. To avoid these horses being distracted and thus impacting negatively on their performance trainers will affix blinkers which block out their peripheral vision.

Quite often a horse will perform exceptionally well the first time they wear blinkers in a race as the jockey can finally make them focus on the task at hand.

Blowout: Just a few days prior to a big race a trainer will put a horse through a blowout session. This is a short and fast paced session that is intended to allow the horse to peak at their top speed in the upcoming race.

Board: At the race track all the odds and race information is shown on the board. This used to be a chalk black board back in the day, but they have now been replaced by fancy digital screens and displays.

You may still see an old style board at some traditional tracks around the country. Bobble: A bobble occurs at the start of a horse race just out of the gate.

The horse can falter on the ground and lose its footing, almost in a bobble motion, causing it to be on the back foot and having to recover while the rest of the horses bolt off.

Blinkers can help in this situation and will usually stop a horse from bolting too often. This term is also used in racing about the layer of ground just below the surface of a track.

Bow: Generally, this is used to describe the tendon below the knee on a horse. Quite often it can rupture as this is a common racing injury.

Break: Ever heard the phrase it will be good once you break it in? Well this is like how the term break is used in horse racing.

Breakage: When pari-mutuel betting systems are used, there will sometimes be some money left over. Usually this is just a few cents. This is called breakage and it will usually be given to the track, taken as commission or paid out to the government as an extra tax.

Breakdown: Every now and then a horse will get an injury and break down. Sometimes the jockey will ease back to give the horse a breather so that they can come home even stronger and take the lead when it matters.

Breeder: A breeder is a person who organises breeding between two horses and the owner of the dam when the foal is born. Breeze: A jockey will sometimes run a horse at a moderate pace; this is known as a breeze.

Bucked Shins: Some horses get inflamed muscles at the front of their cannon bone. This injury is usually more prevalent in young horses who are still relatively new to racing.

Bullet: Trainers will often time a horse on repeated efforts over the same distance in training. The best time they achieve over this distance is known as a bullet.

This specific type of training is known as bullet work. For example, if a player buys a Daily Double ticket for the 1 st and 2 nd race that is 8 with ALL, the bettor will have "bought" the second race.

Carryover: Usually refers to money in the parimutuel pool for a Pick Six wager that is left over after a sequence fails to have a single player select all of the winners.

For example, if there are no winning tickets for a Pick Six on a Friday at a track, the money left in the pool minus the track take is a considered a carryover and will be added to the pool for Saturday's Pick Six.

Successive carryovers can lead to very large Pick Six pools. Claiming Race: A race where each horse in the field has a price and can be purchased by any person that makes a valid claim prior to the running of the race.

Conditions: The circumstances under which a race will be run, such as: surface, distance, purse, and eligibilities. A payout, typically in a Pick Six, where players without a full winning ticket still receive money.

For example, a player that hits 5-of-6 races in the Pick 6 will typically collect a small consolation payout.

Consolations are generally much smaller than the full payout. Daily Double: A wager in which the player attempts to pick the winner of two sequential races with a single ticket.

Dark: A day in which a track is not featuring live racing. Dog: A cone or other obstruction placed a specified distance from the rail of the turf course to keep horses from damaging that portion of the grass.

Exacta: A bet in which the player attempts to pick the 1 st and 2 nd place horse on one ticket. Form: The current condition of a horse; may also refer to The Daily Racing Form publication.

Fractions: Clocking at quarter-mile increments in either a race or a workout. Going: The condition of the racing surface. Dirt courses are generally rated Fast, Good, Muddy, or Sloppy.

Turf courses are generally rated Firm, Good, Yielding, Soft, or Heavy. Graded Race: A stakes race that is assigned a grade I, II, or III by the American Graded Stakes Committee based on the relative strength of the race as compared to all other races.

This is the highest form of racing. Half sister: A female horse out of the same dam as the other horse but with a different sire.

Horses with the same sire but different dams are not considered half sisters or brothers. Handily: A fairly strenuous workout where the jockey urges the horse on but does not use the whip.

Hand ride: A jockey that is urging a horse on by "scrubbing" his hand up and down its neck. Please confirm the wagering regulations in your jurisdiction as they vary from state to state, province to province and country to country.

Any use of this information in violation of federal, state, provincial or local laws is strictly prohibited. Bet Now. Horse Betting Straight Wager Win Place Show Daily Double Trifecta Superfecta Quinella Exacta Exotic Horse Bet How To Bet Horses How To Bet On Horses Read The Daily Racing Form Read Past Performances Advanced Bets Across The Board Place Pick All Box Bets Key A Horse Pick Three Pick Four Pick Six Horse Racing Terms Horse Betting Beginner Tips Horse Racing Legend Thoroughbred Tips Quarter Horse Tips Money Management Kelly Advantage Calculator Maiden Race Allowance Races Starter Allowance Claiming Race Stakes and Handicap.

Horse Racing Terms and Glossary. Sign Up Now. I Want to Bet Now US Racing Horse Betting Horse Racing Terms and Glossary.

Abandoned A race meeting which has been cancelled because a club did not receive sufficient nominations to be able to stage it, or because of bad weather which made racing on the track unsafe.

All bets placed on abandoned races are fully refunded. Acceptor A runner officially listed to start in a race. Accumulator Also, Parlay A multiple bet.

A kind of 'let-it-ride' bet. Making simultaneous selections on two or more races with the intent of pressing the winnings of the first win on the bet of the following race selected, and so on.

All the selections made must win for you to win the accumulator. Across The Board See 'Place' A bet on a horse to win, place or show.

Three wagers combined in one. If the horse wins, the player wins all three wagers, if second, two, and if third, one.

Age All thoroughbreds count January 1 as their birth date. Ajax UK slang term for 'Betting Tax'. All-age Race A race for two-year-olds and up.

All Out A horse who is trying to the best of his ability. Allowances Reductions in weights to be carried allowed because of certain conditions such as; an apprentice jockey is on a horse, a female horse racing against males, or three-year-olds racing against older horses.

All Weather Racing Racing that takes place on an artificial surface. Also Ran Any selection not finishing 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th in a race or event.

Ante Post Also, Futures Bets placed in advance predicting the outcome of a future event. Ante-post prices are those on major sporting events, usually prior to the day of the event itself.

In return for the chance of better odds, punters risk the fact that stakes are not returned if their selection pulls out or is cancelled.

Apprentice A trainee jockey. An apprentice will usually ride only flat races. Approximates The approximate price a horse is quoted at before a race begins.

Bookmakers use these approximates as a guide to set their boards. Arbitrage Where a variation in odds available allows a punter to back both sides and guarantee a win.

ART Artificial Turf. ATS Against The Spread. AWT All weather track. Baby Race A race for two-year-olds. Back To bet or wager.

Backed A 'backed' horse is one on which lots of bets have been placed. Backed-In A horse which is backed-in means that bettors have outlaid a lot of money on that horse, with the result being a decrease in the odds offered.

Back Marker In a standing start event, which is handicapped, the horse who is given the biggest handicap is known as the backmarker. Backstretch The straight way on the far side of the track.

Back Straight The straight length of the track farthest away from the spectators and the winning post. Backward A horse that is either too young or not fully fit.

Banker Also, Key Highly expected to win. The strongest in a multiple selection in a parlay or accumulator. In permutation bets the banker is a selection that must win to guarantee any returns.

Bar Price Refers to the odds of those runners in a race not quoted with a price during early betting shows. The bar price is the minimum odds for any of those selections not quoted.

Barrier Also, Tape A starting device used in steeple chasing consisting of an elastic band stretched across the racetrack which retracts when released.

Barrier Draw The ballot held by the race club to decide which starting stall each runner will occupy.

Bat Also, Stick A jockey's whip. Beard US - A friend or acquaintance or other contact who is used to placing bets so that the bookmakers will not know the identity of the actual bettor.

Many top handicappers and persons occupying sensitive positions use this method of wagering. Bearing In Out - Failing to maintain a straight course, veering to the left or right.

Can be caused by injury, fatigue, outside distraction, or poor riding. Beeswax UK slang term for betting tax.

Also known as 'Bees' or 'Ajax'. Bell Lap In harness racing, the last lap of a race, signified by the ringing of the bell.

Bet A transaction in which monies are deposited or guaranteed. Betting Board A board used by the bookmaker to display the odds of the horses engaged in a race.

Betting Ring The main area at a racecourse where the bookmakers operate. Betting Tax Tax on a Bookmaker's turnover. In the UK this is a 'Duty' levied on every Pound wagered.

In the latter case, no tax is deducted from the punter's winnings. Bettor US - Someone who places or has a bet. A 'Punter' in the UK. Beyer Number A handicapping tool, popularized by author Andrew Beyer, assigning a numerical value to each race run by a horse based on final time and track condition.

This enables different horses running at different racetracks to be objectively compared. Bismarck A favourite which the bookmakers do not expect to win.

Blanket Finish When the horses finish so close to the winning line you could theoretically put a single blanket across them.

Blinkers A cup-shaped device applied over the sides of the horse's head near his eyes to limit his vision. This helps to prevent him from swerving away from distracting objects or other horses on either side of him.

Blinker cups come in a variety of sizes and shapes to allow as little or as much vision as the trainer feels is appropriate.

Board Short for 'Tote Board' on which odds, betting pools and other race information are displayed.

Bomb er - A winning horse sent off at very high odds. Book A bookmaker's tally of amounts bet on each competitor, and odds necessary to assure him of profit.

Bookie U. Short for bookmaker. The person or shop who accepts bets. Bookmaker Person who is licensed to accept bets on the result of an event based on their provision of odds to the customer.

Sportsbook US. Bottle UK slang, odds of 2 to 1. Box A wagering term denoting a combination bet whereby all possible numeric combinations are covered.

Boxed in - To be trapped between other horses. Bobble A bad step away from the starting gate, sometimes caused by the ground breaking away from under a horse and causing him to duck his head or go to his knees.

Bolt Sudden veering from a straight course. Book A collection of all the bets taken on fixed odds betting events. Bookmaker Bookie - A person registered and licensed to bet with the public.

Breakage Those pennies that are left over in pari-mutuel payoffs which are rounded out to a nickel or dime. Breeders' Cup Thoroughbred racing's year-end championship.

First run in Bridge-Jumper US - Bettor who specializes in large show bets on odd-on favourites. Bug Boy An apprentice rider.

Bull Ring Small racetrack less than one mile around. Buy Price In Spread or Index betting, the higher figure quoted by an Index bookmaker.

Buy the Rack US - Purchase every possible daily-double or other combination ticket. Canadian Also known as a Super Yankee. A Canadian is a combination bet consisting of 26 bets with 5 selections in different events.

The combination bet is made up of 10 doubles, 10 trebles, five 4-folds and one 5-fold. Card Another term for fixture or race meeting. Carpet UK slang for Odds of 3 to 1 also known as 'Tres' or 'Gimmel'.

Caulk Projection on the bottom of a shoe to give the horse better traction, especially on a wet track. Chalk Wagering favorite in a race. Dates from the days when on-track bookmakers would write current odds on a chalkboard.

Chalk Player Bettor who wagers on favorites. Chase See 'Steeplechase'. Checked A horse pulled up by his jockey for an instant because he is cut off or in tight quarters.

Chute Extension of the backstretch or homestretch to allow a longer straight run. Client US - Purchaser of betting information from horseman or other tipster.

Close US - Final odds on a horse e. Confusingly equates to 'Starting Price' in the UK. Closer A horse that runs best in the latter part of the race closing race , coming from off the pace.

Co-Favorites Where three or more competitors share the status as favorite. Colors Colours - Racing silks, the jacket and cap worn by jockeys.

Horse Racing Terms A visor differs from blinkers as it has a small slit in the eye cups. Horse Betting. Declared In the Schwebendes Prüfungsverfahren States, a horse withdrawn from a stakes race in advance of scratch time. Betting Board - A board used by the bookmaker to display the odds of the horses engaged in a race. The form may also include some letters, for example F denoting a fall. Horse Racing Terms One of the main ratings used to describe track conditions. There are different types of fence, including an open-ditch, the water jump and a plain fence. In US, to win a race or a bet. Bull Ring: A much shorter track than Delicious EmilyS Hopes And Fears Lösung standard is known as a bull ring. A female horse aged four or younger. Other names for Vorschau Bundesliga type of race include a jumping race and steeplechase. Favourite: The horse with the lowest betting odds. Jonjo ONeill must go back to to find a horse that won all three in Nijinsky. National Thoroughbred Racing Association NTRA - A non-profit, membership organization created in to improve economic conditions and public interest in Thoroughbred racing. Forgot your login details?

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Horse Racing Terms 6/10/ · Here’s a list of horse racing terms to help you understand more about the sport and the available wagers. A. Across the Board: This is a bet placed on a horse to win, place and show. If the horse wins the race then you win on all three bets, if it comes second you win on two bets, and if it comes third you only win on one bet. Maiden: A horse that has never won a race; or a race for horses that have never won a race. Marathon: A race longer than 1 ¼ miles long. Mare: A female horse aged five or older. Middle distance: A race longer than seven furlongs but shorter than 1 1/8 miles. Miler: A horse that prefers to race at or near a . Judge The person who declares the official placing for each race. This can be a result of the age or the gender of the horse or the type of Texas Holdem Regeln Pdf amateur. Official timing starts when flag is dropped to denote proper start.

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